1932

Abstract

The gut microbiome influences many host physiologies, spanning gastrointestinal function, metabolism, immune homeostasis, neuroactivity, and behavior. Many microbial effects on the host are orchestrated by bidirectional interactions between the microbiome and immune system. Imbalances in this dialogue can lead to immune dysfunction and immune-mediated conditions in distal organs including the brain. Dysbiosis of the gut microbiome and dysregulated neuroimmune responses are common comorbidities of neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurological disorders, highlighting the importance of the gut microbiome–neuroimmune axis as a regulator of central nervous system homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent evidence supporting a role for the gut microbiome in regulating the neuroimmune landscape in health and disease.

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2022-04-26
2024-06-17
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