1932

Abstract

A high diversity of αβ T cell receptors (TCRs), capable of recognizing virtually any pathogen but also self-antigens, is generated during T cell development in the thymus. Nevertheless, a strict developmental program supports the selection of a self-tolerant T cell repertoire capable of responding to foreign antigens. The steps of T cell selection are controlled by cortical and medullary stromal niches, mainly composed of thymic epithelial cells and dendritic cells. The integration of important cues provided by these specialized niches, including () the TCR signal strength induced by the recognition of self-peptide-MHC complexes, () costimulatory signals, and () cytokine signals, critically controls T cell repertoire selection. This review discusses our current understanding of the signals that coordinate positive selection, negative selection, and agonist selection of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. It also highlights recent advances that have unraveled the functional diversity of thymic antigen-presenting cell subsets implicated in T cell selection.

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2022-04-26
2024-06-22
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