1932

Abstract

A principal purpose of type 2 immunity was thought to be defense against large parasites, but it also functions in the restoration of homeostasis, such as toxin clearance following snake bites. In other cases, like allergy, the type 2 T helper (Th2) cytokines and cells present in the environment are detrimental and cause diseases. In recent years, the recognition of cell heterogeneity within Th2-associated cell populations has revealed specific functions of cells with a particular phenotype or gene signature. In addition, here we discuss the recent data regarding heterogeneity of type 2 immunity–related cells, as well as their newly identified role in a variety of processes ranging from involvement in respiratory viral infections [especially in the context of the recent COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic] to control of cancer development or of metabolic homeostasis.

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2022-04-26
2024-06-13
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