1932

Abstract

Many of the pathways that underlie the diversification of naive T cells into effector and memory subsets, and the maintenance of these populations, remain controversial. In recent years a variety of experimental tools have been developed that allow us to follow the fates of cells and their descendants. In this review we describe how mathematical models provide a natural language for describing the growth, loss, and differentiation of cell populations. By encoding mechanistic descriptions of cell behavior, models can help us interpret these new datasets and reveal the rules underpinning T cell fate decisions, both at steady state and during immune responses.

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2023-04-26
2024-04-21
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