1932

Abstract

Nearly all animal cells contain proteins evolved to trigger the destruction of the cell in which they reside. The activation of these proteins occurs via sequential programs, and much effort has been expended in delineating the molecular mechanisms underlying the resulting processes of programmed cell death (PCD). These efforts have led to the definition of apoptosis as a form of nonimmunogenic PCD that is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, and of pyroptosis and necroptosis as forms of PCD initiated by pathogen infection that are associated with inflammation and immune activation. While this paradigm has served the field well, numerous recent studies have highlighted cross talk between these programs, challenging the idea that apoptosis, pyroptosis, and necroptosis are linear pathways with defined immunological outputs. Here, we discuss the emerging idea of cell death as a signaling network, considering connections between cell death pathways both as we observe them now and in their evolutionary origins. We also discuss the engagement and subversion of cell death pathways by pathogens, as well as the key immunological outcomes of these processes.

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2021-04-26
2024-04-21
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