1932

Abstract

The worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has led to the unprecedented pace of development of multiple vaccines. This review evaluates how adenovirus (Ad) vector platforms have been leveraged in response to this pandemic. Ad vectors have been used in the past for vaccines against other viruses, most notably HIV and Ebola, but they never have been produced, distributed, or administered to humans at such a large scale. Several different serotypes of Ads encoding SARS-CoV-2 Spike have been tested and found to be efficacious against COVID-19. As vaccine rollouts continue and the number of people receiving these vaccines increases, we will continue to learn about this vaccine platform for COVID-19 prevention and control.

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2022-01-27
2024-06-23
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