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Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest infections afflicting humans yet remains the number one infectious disease killer worldwide. Despite decades of experience treating this disease, TB regimens require months of multidrug therapy, even for latent infections. There have been important recent advances in treatment options across the spectrum of TB, from latent infection to extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB disease. In addition, new, potent drugs are emerging out of the development pipeline and are being tested in novel regimens in multiple currently enrolling trials. Shorter, safer regimens for many forms of TB are now available or are in our near-term vision. We review recent advances in TB therapeutics and provide an overview of the upcoming clinical trials landscape that will help define the future of worldwide TB treatment.

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2019-01-27
2024-06-24
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