1932

Abstract

Antiretroviral drugs have revolutionized the treatment and prevention of HIV infection; however, adherence is critical for sustained efficacy. Current HIV treatment consists of three-drug regimens, and current HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) consists of a two-drug regimen; both generally require adherence to once-daily dosing. Long-acting formulations are useful in the treatment and prevention of other conditions (e.g., contraceptives, antipsychotics) and help promote adherence. Newer long-acting formulations of approved and investigational antiretroviral drugs in existing and newer mechanistic classes are under study for HIV treatment and prevention, including some phase III trials. Although long-acting antiretroviral drugs hold promise, some clinical challenges exist, including managing side effects, drug-drug interactions, pregnancy, and long-lasting drug concentrations that could lead to the development of drug resistance. This review aims to summarize currently available information on long-acting antiretroviral drugs for HIV treatment and prevention.

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2019-01-27
2024-04-18
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