1932

Abstract

Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome of diverse etiologies and can be associated with preserved, reduced, or mid-range ejection fraction (EF). In the community, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is emerging as the most common form of HF. There remains considerable uncertainty regarding its pathogenesis, diagnosis, and optimal therapeutic approach. Hypotheses have been advanced to explain the underlying pathophysiology responsible for HFpEF, but to date, no specific therapy based on these hypotheses has been proven to improve outcomes in HFpEF. We provide a clinically focused review of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, pathophysiology, and treatment of HFpEF.

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2018-01-29
2024-06-17
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