1932

Abstract

Several factors, including genetics, family history, diet, physical activity, obesity, and insulin resistance in puberty, appear to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in youth. Youth-onset type 2 diabetes is often thought of as a single entity but rather exists as a spectrum of disease with differences in presentation, metabolic characteristics, clinical progression, and complication rates. We review what is currently known regarding the risks associated with developing type 2 diabetes in youth. Additionally, we focus on the spectrum of phenotypes of pediatric type 2 diabetes, discuss the pathogenic underpinnings and potential therapeutic relevance of this heterogeneity, and compare youth-onset type 2 diabetes with type 1 diabetes and adult-onset type 2 diabetes. Finally, we highlight knowledge gaps in prediction and prevention of youth-onset type 2 diabetes.

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2022-01-27
2024-06-16
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