1932

Abstract

For decades, conventional adenomas were the only known precursor lesions of colorectal cancer (CRC). Accordingly, education and research regarding CRC prevention were mainly focused on adenomas. The groundbreaking discovery that serrated polyps (SPs) also have the potential to develop into CRCs, and seem to account for a considerable proportion of sporadic CRCs, has led to a paradigm shift in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of CRC. Studies in recent years have led to our current understanding of SPs and associated CRC, but a lot of work is still to be done to further improve knowledge about this serrated neoplasia pathway and the clinical management of SPs and serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS). In this review, we reflect on the current understanding of SPs with respect to terminology, detection, resection, and surveillance and reflect on the management of SPS.

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2022-01-27
2024-06-13
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