1932

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has created a global pandemic. Beyond the well-described respiratory manifestations, SARS-CoV-2 may cause a variety of neurologic complications, including headaches, alteration in taste and smell, encephalopathy, cerebrovascular disease, myopathy, psychiatric diseases, and ocular disorders. Herein we describe SARS-CoV-2’s mechanism of neuroinvasion and the epidemiology, outcomes, and treatments for neurologic manifestations of COVID-19.

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2022-01-27
2024-05-25
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