1932

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) arise from a convergence of genetic risk, environmental factors, and gut microbiota, where each is necessary but not sufficient to cause disease. Emerging evidence supports a bidirectional relationship between disease progression and changes in microbiota membership and function. Thus, the study of the gut microbiome and host–microbe interactions should provide critical insights into disease pathogenesis as well as leads for developing microbiome-based diagnostics and interventions for IBD. In this article, we review the most recent advances in understanding the relationship between the gut microbiota and IBD and highlight the importance of going beyond establishing description and association to gain mechanistic insights into causes and consequences of IBD. The review aims to contextualize recent findings to form conceptional frameworks for understanding the etiopathogenesis of IBD and for the future development of microbiome-based diagnostics and interventions.

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2022-01-27
2024-06-22
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