1932

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) was described in 1906 as a dementing disease marked by the presence of two types of fibrillar aggregates in the brain: neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. The process of aggregation and formation of the aggregates has been a major focus of investigation ever since the discoveries that the tau protein is the predominant protein in tangles and amyloid β is the predominant protein in plaques. The idea that smaller, oligomeric species of amyloid may also be bioactive has now been clearly established. This review examines the possibility that soluble, nonfibrillar, bioactive forms of tau—the “tau we cannot see”—comprise a dominant driver of neurodegeneration in AD.

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2023-01-27
2024-06-17
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