1932

Abstract

Myocardial infarction with nonobstructive coronary arteries (MINOCA) is an important subtype of myocardial infarction (MI) that occurs in approximately 6–8% of patients with spontaneous MI who are referred for coronary angiography. MINOCA disproportionately affects women, but men are also affected. Pathogenesis is more variable than in MI with obstructive coronary artery disease (MI-CAD). Dominant mechanisms include atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and coronary artery spasm. Management of MINOCA varies based on the underlying mechanism of infarction. Therefore, systematic approaches to diagnosis are recommended. The combination of invasive coronary angiography, multivessel intracoronary imaging, provocative testing for coronary spasm, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides the greatest diagnostic yield. Current clinical practice guidelines for the secondary prevention of MI are based largely on data from patients with MI-CAD. Thus, optimal medications after MINOCA are uncertain. Clinical trials focused on the treatment of patients with MINOCA are urgently needed to define optimal care.

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2023-01-27
2024-06-24
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