1932

Abstract

Club cell secretory protein (CCSP), also known as secretoglobin 1A1 (gene name ), is one of the most abundant proteins in the lung, primarily produced by club cells of the distal airway epithelium. At baseline, CCSP is found in large concentrations in lung fluid specimens and can also be detected in the blood and urine. Obstructive lung diseases are generally associated with reduced CCSP levels, thought to be due to decreased CCSP production or club cell depletion. Conversely, several restrictive lung diseases have been found to have increased CCSP levels both in the lung and in the circulation, likely related to club cell dysregulation as well as increasedlung permeability. Recent studies demonstrate multiple mechanisms by which CCSP dampens acute and chronic lung inflammation. Given these anti-inflammatory effects, CCSP represents a novel potential therapeutic modality in lung disease.

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2023-01-27
2024-04-19
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