1932

Abstract

In 2020, the nephrology community formally interrogated long-standing race-based clinical algorithms used in the field, including the kidney function estimation equations. A comprehensive understanding of the history of kidney function estimation and racial essentialism is necessary to understand underpinnings of the incorporation of a Black race coefficient into prior equations. We provide a review of this history, as well as the considerations used to develop race-free equations that are a guidepost for a more equity-oriented, scientifically rigorous future for kidney function estimation and other clinical algorithms and processes in which race may be embedded as a variable.

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2023-01-27
2024-06-18
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