1932

Abstract

Chronic respiratory failure is a common, important complication of many types of neuromuscular and chest wall disorders. While the pathophysiology of each disease may be different, these disorders can variably affect all muscles involved in breathing, including inspiratory, expiratory, and bulbar muscles, ultimately leading to chronic respiratory failure and hypoventilation. The use of home assisted ventilation through noninvasive interfaces aims to improve the symptoms of hypoventilation, improve sleep quality, and, when possible, improve mortality. An increasing variety of interfaces has allowed for improved comfort and compliance. In a minority of scenarios, noninvasive ventilation is either not appropriate or no longer effective due to disease progression, and a transition to tracheal ventilation should be considered.

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2023-01-27
2024-06-14
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