1932

Abstract

The multifaceted interaction between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the endocrine system has been a major area of scientific research over the past two years. While common endocrine/metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes have been recognized among significant risk factors for COVID-19 severity, several endocrine organs were identified to be targeted by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). New-onset endocrine disorders related to COVID-19 were reported while long-term effects, if any, are yet to be determined. Meanwhile, the “stay home” measures during the pandemic caused interruption in the care of patients with pre-existing endocrine disorders and may have impeded the diagnosis and treatment of new ones. This review aims to outline this complex interaction between COVID-19 and endocrine disorders by synthesizing the current scientific knowledge obtained from clinical and pathophysiological studies, and to emphasize considerations for future research.

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2023-01-27
2024-04-14
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