1932

Abstract

An etiologically based classification of diabetes is needed to account for the heterogeneity of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D) and emerging forms of diabetes worldwide. It may be productive for both classification and clinical discovery to consider variant forms of diabetes as a spectrum. Maturity onset diabetes of youth and neonatal diabetes serve as models for etiologically defined, rare forms of diabetes in the spectrum. Ketosis-prone diabetes is a model for more complex forms, amenable to phenotypic dissection. Bioinformatic approaches such as clustering analyses of large datasets and multi-omics investigations of rare and atypical phenotypes are promising avenues to explore and define new subgroups of diabetes.

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2021-01-27
2024-06-21
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