1932

Abstract

Opioid use disorder continues to drive overdose deaths in many countries, including the United States. Illicit fentanyl and its analogues have emerged as key contributors to the complications and mortality associated with opioid use disorder. Medications for opioid use disorder treatment, such as methadone and buprenorphine, are safe and substantially reduce opioid use, infectious complications, and mortality risk, but remain underutilized. Polysubstance use and emerging substances such as xylazine and designer benzodiazepines create additional treatment challenges. Recent clinical and policy innovations in treatment delivery, including telemedicine, bridge clinics, and expanded models for accessing methadone have the potential to increase access to life-saving care for people living with opioid use disorder.

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2024-01-29
2024-06-25
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