1932

Abstract

Despite significant advances in the field of transplantation in the past two decades, current clinically available therapeutic options for immunomodulation remain fairly limited. The advent of calcineurin inhibitor–based immunosuppression has led to significant success in improving short-term graft survival; however, improvements in long-term graft survival have stalled. Solid organ transplantation provides a unique opportunity for immunomodulation of both the donor organ prior to implantation and the recipient post transplantation. Furthermore, therapies beyond targeting the adaptive immune system have the potential to ameliorate ischemic injury to the allograft and halt its aging process, augment its repair, and promote recipient immune tolerance. Other recent advances include expanding the donor pool by reducing organ discard, and bioengineering and genetically modifying organs from other species to generate transplantable organs. Therapies discussed here will likely be most impactful if individualized on the basis of specific donor and recipient considerations.

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2024-01-29
2024-04-17
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