1932

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of suicide in the world. Monoamine-based antidepressant drugs are a primary line of treatment for this mental disorder, although the delayed response and incomplete efficacy in some patients highlight the need for improved therapeutic approaches. Over the past two decades, ketamine has shown rapid onset with sustained (up to several days) antidepressant effects in patients whose MDD has not responded to conventional antidepressant drugs. Recent preclinical studies have started to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ketamine's antidepressant properties. Herein, we describe and compare recent clinical and preclinical findings to provide a broad perspective of the relevant mechanisms for the antidepressant action of ketamine.

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2024-01-29
2024-04-16
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