1932

Abstract

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a relapsing and remitting inflammatory disease of the colon with a variable course. Despite advances in treatment, only approximately 40% of patients achieve clinical remission at the end of a year, prompting the exploration of new treatment modalities. This review explores novel therapeutic approaches to UC, including promising drugs in various stages of development, efforts to maximize the efficacy of currently available treatment options, and non-medication-based modalities. Treatment approaches which show promise in impacting the future of UC management are highlighted.

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2021-01-27
2024-06-24
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