1932

Abstract

Cardiometabolic disease (CMD), such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The gut microbiota has emerged as a potential target to beneficially modulate CMD risk, possibly via dietary interventions. Dietary interventions have been shown to considerably alter gut microbiota composition and function. Moreover, several diet-derived microbial metabolites are able to modulate human metabolism and thereby alter CMD risk. Dietary interventions that affect gut microbiota composition and function are therefore a promising, novel, and cost-efficient method to reduce CMD risk. Studies suggest that fermentable carbohydrates can beneficially alter gut microbiota composition and function, whereas high animal protein and high fat intake negatively impact gut microbiota function and composition. This review focuses on the role of macronutrients (i.e., carbohydrate, protein, and fat) and dietary patterns (e.g., vegetarian/vegan and Mediterranean diet) in gut microbiota composition and function in the context of CMD.

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2020-01-27
2024-04-15
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