1932

Abstract

The introduction of targeted biologic therapies has changed the treatment landscape for autoimmune diseases (ADs) substantially, but although these therapies provide more specificity, they require continuous administration, rarely restore organ function or reverse disability, and are not curative. Over the last 25 years, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been increasingly used to treat patients in whom the risk:benefit ratio of HSCT is acceptable. In contrast to chronic suppression of immune function, this intensive one-off procedure aims to provide treatment-free remissions by the reinduction of self-tolerance. The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) Autoimmune Diseases Working Party (ADWP) has been central to development of this approach, with over 3,300 HSCT registrations for ADs. Recent data have improved the evidence base to support autologous HSCT in multiple sclerosis, systemic sclerosis, and Crohn's disease, along with a wide range of rarer disease indications, and autologous HSCT has become an integral part of treatment algorithms in various ADs.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-med-070119-115617
2021-01-27
2024-06-12
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