1932

Abstract

Mpox, previously known as monkeypox, is caused by an related to the variola virus that causes smallpox. Prior to 2022, mpox was considered a zoonotic disease endemic to central and west Africa. Since May 2022, more than 86,000 cases of mpox from 110 countries have been identified across the world, predominantly in men who have sex with men, most often acquired through close physical contact or during sexual activity. The classical clinical presentation of mpox is a prodrome including fever, lethargy, and lymphadenopathy followed by a characteristic vesiculopustular rash. The recent 2022 outbreak included novel presentations of mpox with a predominance of anogenital lesions, mucosal lesions, and other features such as anorectal pain, proctitis, oropharyngeal lesions, tonsillitis, and multiphasic skin lesions. We describe the demographics and clinical spectrum of classical and novel mpox, outlining the potential complications and management.

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2024-01-29
2024-06-19
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