1932

Abstract

Statins, ezetimibe, and PCSK9 inhibitors are currently the standard of care for the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease. Despite their widespread use, coronary artery disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide, a fact that pleads for the development of new protective therapies. In no small part due to advances in the field of human genetics, many new therapies targeting various lipid traits or inflammation have recently received approval from regulatory agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration or fared favorably in clinical trials. This wave of new therapies promises to transform the care of patients at risk for life-threatening coronary events.

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2021-01-27
2024-04-15
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