1932

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in Caucasian patients. Continued advances have led to improved survival, and adults with CF now outnumber children. As our understanding of the disease improves, new therapies have emerged that improve the basic defect, enabling patient-specific treatment and improved outcomes. However, recurrent exacerbations continue to lead to morbidity and mortality, and new pathogens have been identified that may lead to worse outcomes. In addition, new complications, such as CF-related diabetes and increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers, are creating new challenges in management. For patients with end-stage disease, lung transplantation has remained one of the few treatment options, but challenges in identifying the most appropriate patients remain.

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2019-01-27
2024-04-20
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