1932

Abstract

Amyloids are implicated in many protein misfolding diseases. Amyloid folds, however, also display a range of functional roles particularly in the microbial world. The templating ability of these folds endows them with specific properties allowing their self-propagation and protein-to-protein transmission in vivo. This property, the prion principle, is exploited by specific signaling pathways that use transmission of the amyloid fold as a way to convey information from a receptor to an effector protein. I describe here amyloid signaling pathways involving fungal nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors that were found to control nonself recognition and programmed cell death processes. Studies on these fungal amyloid signaling motifs stem from the characterization of the fungal [Het-s] prion protein and have led to the identification in fungi but also in multicellular bacteria of several distinct families of signaling motifs, one of which is related to RHIM [receptor-interacting protein (RIP) homotypic interaction motif], an amyloid motif regulating mammalian necroptosis.

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2020-09-08
2024-04-15
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