1932

Abstract

Chromosome segregation during the cell cycle is an evolutionarily conserved, fundamental biological process. Dynamic interaction between spindle microtubules and the kinetochore complex that assembles on centromere DNA is required for faithful chromosome segregation. The first artificial minichromosome was constructed by cloning the centromere DNA of the budding yeast . Since then, centromeres have been identified in >60 fungal species. The DNA sequence and organization of the sequence elements are highly diverse across these fungal centromeres. In this article, we provide a comprehensive view of the evolution of fungal centromeres. Studies of this process facilitated the identification of factors influencing centromere specification, maintenance, and propagation through many generations. Additionally, we discuss the unique features and plasticity of centromeric chromatin and the involvement of centromeres in karyotype evolution. Finally, we discuss the implications of recurrent loss of RNA interference (RNAi) and/or heterochromatin components on the trajectory of the evolution of fungal centromeres and propose the centromere structure of the last common ancestor of three major fungal phyla—Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Mucoromycota.

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2020-09-08
2024-06-17
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