1932

Abstract

The blast disease, caused by the ascomycete , poses a great threat to rice production worldwide. Increasing use of fungicides and/or blast-resistant varieties of rice () has proved to be ineffective in long-term control of blast disease under field conditions. To develop effective and durable resistance to blast, it is important to understand the cellular mechanisms underlying pathogenic development in . In this review, we summarize the latest research in phototropism, autophagy, nutrient and redox signaling, and intrinsic phytohormone mimics in for cellular and metabolic adaptation(s) during its interactions with the host plants.

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2019-09-08
2024-06-25
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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