1932

Abstract

Plant-pathogenic oomycetes include numerous species that are ongoing threats to agriculture and natural ecosystems. Understanding the molecular dialogs between oomycetes and plants is instrumental for sustaining effective disease control. Plants respond to oomycete infection by multiple defense actions including strengthening of physical barriers, production of antimicrobial molecules, and programmed cell death. These responses are tightly controlled and integrated via a three-layered immune system consisting of a multiplex recognition layer, a resilient signal-integration layer, and a diverse defense-action layer. Adapted oomycete pathogens utilize apoplastic and intracellular effector arsenals to counter plant immunity mechanisms within each layer, including by evasion or suppression of recognition, interference with numerous signaling components, and neutralization or suppression of defense actions. A coevolutionary arms race continually drives the emergence of new mechanisms of plant defense and oomycete counterdefense.

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2019-09-08
2024-06-25
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