1932

Abstract

Most bacteria are surrounded by a peptidoglycan cell wall that defines their shape and protects them from osmotic lysis. The expansion and division of this structure therefore plays an integral role in bacterial growth and division. Additionally, the biogenesis of the peptidoglycan layer is the target of many of our most effective antibiotics. Thus, a better understanding of how the cell wall is built will enable the development of new therapies to combat the rise of drug-resistant bacterial infections. This review covers recent advances in defining the mechanisms involved in assembling the peptidoglycan layer with an emphasis on discoveries related to the function and regulation of the cell elongation and division machineries in the model organisms and .

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2021-10-08
2024-04-14
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