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Abstract

Microbial pathogens have evolved complex mechanisms to interface with host cells in order to evade host defenses and replicate. However, mammalian innate immune receptors detect the presence of molecules unique to the microbial world or sense the activity of virulence factors, activating antimicrobial and inflammatory pathways. We focus on how studies of the major virulence factor of one group of microbial pathogens, the type III secretion system (T3SS) of human pathogenic , have shed light on these important innate immune responses. are largely extracellular pathogens, yet they insert T3SS cargo into target host cells that modulate the activity of cytosolic innate immune receptors. This review covers both the host pathways that detect the T3SS and the effector proteins used by to manipulate innate immune signaling.

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2020-09-08
2024-06-14
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