1932

Abstract

Endospore formation in provides an ideal model system for studying development in bacteria. Sporulation studies have contributed a wealth of information about the mechanisms of cell-specific gene expression, chromosome dynamics, protein localization, and membrane remodeling, while helping to dispel the early view that bacteria lack internal organization and interesting cell biological phenomena. In this review, we focus on the architectural transformations that lead to a profound reorganization of the cellular landscape during sporulation, from two cells that lie side by side to the endospore, the unique cell within a cell structure that is a hallmark of sporulation in and other spore-forming . We discuss new insights into the mechanisms that drive morphogenesis, with special emphasis on polar septation, chromosome translocation, and the phagocytosis-like process of engulfment, and also the key experimental advances that have proven valuable in revealing the inner workings of bacterial cells.

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2020-09-08
2024-06-23
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