1932

Abstract

Most bacteria are protected from environmental offenses by a cell wall consisting of strong yet elastic peptidoglycan. The cell wall is essential for preserving bacterial morphology and viability, and thus the enzymes involved in the production and turnover of peptidoglycan have become preferred targets for many of our most successful antibiotics. In the past decades, , the gram-negative pathogen causing the diarrheal disease cholera, has become a major model for understanding cell wall genetics, biochemistry, and physiology. More than 100 articles have shed light on novel cell wall genetic determinants, regulatory links, and adaptive mechanisms. Here we provide the first comprehensive review of ’s cell wall biology and genetics. Special emphasis is placed on the similarities and differences with , the paradigm for understanding cell wall metabolism and chemical structure in gram-negative bacteria.

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2021-10-08
2024-06-24
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