1932

Abstract

Secretion of cellular components across the plasma membrane is an essential process that enables organisms to interact with their environments. Production of extracellular vesicles in bacteria is a well-documented but poorly understood process. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in gram-negative bacteria by blebbing of the outer membrane. In addition to their roles in pathogenesis, cell-to-cell communication, and stress responses, OMVs play important roles in immunomodulation and the establishment and balance of the gut microbiota. In this review, we discuss the multiple roles of OMVs and the current knowledge of OMV biogenesis. We also discuss the growing and promising biotechnological applications of OMV.

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2021-10-08
2024-04-22
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