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Abstract

The endocannabinoid system is involved in signal transduction in mammals. It comprises principally G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonists, called endocannabinoids, as well as the enzymes and transporters responsible for the metabolism of endocannabinoids. Two arachidonic acid–containing lipid molecules, arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, function as endocannabinoids. -acylethanolamines and monoacylglycerols, in which the arachidonic acid chain is replaced with a saturated or monounsaturated fatty acid, are not directly involved in the endocannabinoid system but exhibit agonistic activities for other receptors. These endocannabinoid-like moleculesinclude palmitoylethanolamide, oleoylethanolamide (OEA), and 2-oleoylglycerol. Endocannabinoids stimulate feeding behavior and the anabolism of lipids and glucose, while OEA suppresses appetite. Both central and peripheral systems are included in these nutritional and metabolic contexts. Therefore, they have potential in the treatment and prevention of obesity. We outline the structure, metabolism, and biological activities of endocannabinoids and related molecules, and focus on their involvement in energy homeostasis and metabolic regulation.

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2021-10-11
2024-04-13
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