1932

Abstract

From my senior school days, I had wanted to pursue a career in food. In quite what capacity I was not too sure. So my starting points were within the fields of animal nutrition before moving for the major part of my career to medical schools to study human nutrition and health. My career scientific achievements lie within the Kuhnian spectrum of normal science, but within that normality, I was always one to challenge conventional wisdom. An academic career is about more than just research. It is about teaching and not just the minutiae of nutrition, but about life and living, about challenges and failures. Reflecting on the experience of that career, my advice to early stage researchers is this: Be patient, determined, and resilient in the very early stages. Hold no fear of change and be courageous in challenging conventional wisdom. Always favor openness and collaboration and always seek to help others. Citation indices are important to your career, but these other avenues that I advise you to follow are what you will eventually be most proud of.

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2018-08-21
2024-06-13
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