1932

Abstract

Proper timing of critical care nutrition has long been a matter of controversy. Critical illness waxes and wanes in stages, creating a dynamic flux in energy needs that we have only begun to examine. Furthermore, response to nutrition support likely differs greatly at the level of the individual patient in regard to genetic status, disease stage, comorbidities, and more. We review the observational and randomized literature concerning timing in nutrition support, discuss mechanisms of harm in feeding critically ill patients, and highlight the role of precision nutrition for moving the literature beyond the realm of blunt population averages into one that accounts for the patient-specific complexities of critical illness and host genetics.

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2021-10-11
2024-06-22
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