1932

Abstract

Rapid removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes, a process known as efferocytosis, is key for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, the resolution of inflammation, and tissue repair. However, impaired efferocytosis can result in the accumulation of apoptotic cells, subsequently triggering sterile inflammation through the release of endogenous factors such as DNA and nuclear proteins from membrane permeabilized dying cells. Here, we review the molecular basis of the three key phases of efferocytosis, that is, the detection, uptake, and degradation of apoptotic materials by phagocytes. We also discuss how defects in efferocytosis due to the alteration of phagocytes and dying cells can contribute to the low-grade chronic inflammation that occurs during aging, described as inflammaging. Lastly, we explore opportunities in targeting and harnessing the efferocytic machinery to limit aging-associated inflammatory diseases.

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2024-01-23
2024-06-14
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-032723-110507
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