1932

Abstract

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an important intracellular second messenger, mediates cellular functional responses in all vital organs. Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) is one of the 11 members of the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) family that specifically targets cGMP generated by nitric oxide–driven activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase. PDE5 inhibitors, including sildenafil and tadalafil, are widely used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and certain urological disorders. Preclinical studies have shown promising effects of PDE5 inhibitors in the treatment of myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, cancer and anticancer-drug-associated cardiotoxicity, diabetes, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's disease, and other aging-related conditions. Many clinical trials with PDE5 inhibitors have focused on the potential cardiovascular, anticancer, and neurological benefits. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge on PDE5 inhibitors and their potential therapeutic indications for various clinical disorders beyond erectile dysfunction.

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2023-01-20
2024-04-16
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