1932

Abstract

Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia and a major contributor to poor functional outcomes. Methods for assessment of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia are now well established. In addition, there has been increasing appreciation in recent years of the additional role of social cognitive impairment in driving functional outcomes and of the contributions of sensory-level dysfunction to higher-order impairments. At the neurochemical level, acute administration of -methyl--aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists reproduces the pattern of neurocognitive dysfunction associated with schizophrenia, encouraging the development of treatments targeted at both NMDAR and its interactome. At the local-circuit level, an auditory neurophysiological measure, mismatch negativity, has emerged both as a veridical index of NMDAR dysfunction and excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in schizophrenia and as a critical biomarker for early-stage translational drug development. Although no compounds have yet been approved for treatment of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia, several candidates are showing promise in early-phase testing.

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2023-01-20
2024-04-22
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