1932

Abstract

The capacity to search memory for events learned in a particular context stands as one of the most remarkable feats of the human brain. How is memory search accomplished? First, I review the central ideas investigated by theorists developing models of memory. Then, I review select benchmark findings concerning memory search and analyze two influential computational approaches to modeling memory search: dual-store theory and retrieved context theory. Finally, I discuss the key theoretical ideas that have emerged from these modeling studies and the open questions that need to be answered by future research.

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2020-01-04
2024-06-21
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