1932

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that adolescence is an important time for self- and other-oriented development that underlies many skills vital for becoming a contributing member of society with healthy intergroup relations. It is often assumed that these two processes, thinking about self and thinking about others, are pitted against each other when adolescents engage in social decision making such as giving or sharing. Recent evidence from social neuroscience, however, does not support this notion of conflicting motives, suggesting instead that thinking about self and others relies on a common network of social-affective brain regions, with the medial prefrontal cortex playing a central role in the integration of perspectives related to self and others. Here, we argue that self- and other-oriented thinking are intertwined processes that rely on an overlapping neural network. Adolescents’ motivation to contribute to society can be fostered most when self- and other-oriented motives align.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-psych-010419-050937
2020-01-04
2024-04-16
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/psych/71/1/annurev-psych-010419-050937.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-psych-010419-050937&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Achterberg M, Peper JS, Van Duijvenvoorde AC, Mandl RC, Crone EA 2016. Fronto-striatal white matter integrity predicts development in delay of gratification: a longitudinal study. J. Neurosci. 36:1954–61Longitudinal MRI study with two time points demonstrating the relation between structural ventral striatum–prefrontal cortex connectivity and developmental changes in delay discounting.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Arnett JJ. 2000. Emerging adulthood: a theory of development from the late teens through the twenties. Am. Psychol. 55:469–80
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Ayduk O, Mendoza-Denton R, Mischel W, Downey G, Peake PK, Rodriguez M 2000. Regulating the interpersonal self: strategic self-regulation for coping with rejection sensitivity. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 79:776–92
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Baek EC, Scholz C, O'Donnell MB, Falk EB 2017. The value of sharing information: a neural account of information transmission. Psychol. Sci. 28:851–61This innovative study uses functional neuroimaging to show that information sharing through social networks leads to activity in reward centers in the brain.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bas-Hoogendam JM, van Steenbergen H, Kreuk T, van der Wee NJA, Westenberg PM 2017. How embarrassing! The behavioral and neural correlates of processing social norm violations. PLOS ONE 12:e0176326
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Becht AI, Bos MGN, Nelemans SA, Peters S, Vollebergh WAM et al. 2018. Goal-directed correlates and neurobiological underpinnings of adolescent identity: a multimethod multisample longitudinal approach. Child. Dev. 89:823–36
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Becht AI, Nelemans SA, Branje SJ, Vollebergh WAM, Koot HM et al. 2016. The quest for identity in adolescence: heterogeneity in daily identity formation and psychosocial adjustment across 5 years. Dev. Psychol. 52:2010–21
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Becht AI, Nelemans SA, Branje SJT, Vollebergh WAM, Koot HM, Meeus WHJ 2017a. Identity uncertainty and commitment making across adolescence: five-year within-person associations using daily identity reports. Dev. Psychol. 53:2103–12
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Becht AI, Nelemans SA, van Dijk MPA, Branje SJT, Van Lier PAC et al. 2017b. Clear self, better relationships: adolescents' self-concept clarity and relationship quality with parents and peers across 5 years. Child. Dev. 88:1823–33
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Berns GS, Capra CM, Moore S, Noussair C 2010. Neural mechanisms of the influence of popularity on adolescent ratings of music. NeuroImage 49:2687–96
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Bickart KC, Hollenbeck MC, Barrett LF, Dickerson BC 2012. Intrinsic amygdala–cortical functional connectivity predicts social network size in humans. J. Neurosci. 32:14729–41
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Blakemore SJ, Burnett S, Dahl RE 2010. The role of puberty in the developing adolescent brain. Hum. Brain Mapp. 31:926–33
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Blakemore SJ, den Ouden H, Choudhury S, Frith C 2007. Adolescent development of the neural circuitry for thinking about intentions. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 2:130–39
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Blakemore SJ, Mills KL. 2014. Is adolescence a sensitive period for sociocultural processing. ? Annu. Rev. Psychol. 65:187–207This timely review raised the important question of whether neural changes during adolescence provide a window for increased social influence.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Blankenstein NE, Telzer EH, Do KT, Van Duijvenvoorde ACK, Crone EA 2019. Behavioral and neural pathways supporting the development of prosocial and risk-taking behavior across adolescence. Child Dev In press
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Braams BR, Crone EA. 2017. Peers and parents: a comparison between neural activation when winning for friends and mothers in adolescence. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 12:417–26
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Braams BR, Güroğlu B, de Water E, Meuwese R, Koolschijn PC et al. 2014a. Reward-related neural responses are dependent on the beneficiary. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 9:1030–37One of the first functional neuroimaging studies showing that vicarious gaining for others is dependent on experienced closeness with the target.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Braams BR, Peters S, Peper JS, Güroğlu B, Crone EA 2014b. Gambling for self, friends, and antagonists: differential contributions of affective and social brain regions on adolescent reward processing. NeuroImage 100:281–89
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Braams BR, van Duijvenvoorde AC, Peper JS, Crone EA 2015. Longitudinal changes in adolescent risk-taking: a comprehensive study of neural responses to rewards, pubertal development, and risk-taking behavior. J. Neurosci. 35:7226–38
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Burnett S, Bird G, Moll J, Frith C, Blakemore SJ 2009. Development during adolescence of the neural processing of social emotion. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 21:1736–50
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Burnett S, Sebastian C, Cohen Kadosh K, Blakemore SJ 2011. The social brain in adolescence: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging and behavioural studies. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 35:1654–64
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Campbell-Meiklejohn DK, Bach DR, Roepstorff A, Dolan RJ, Frith CD 2010. How the opinion of others affects our valuation of objects. Curr. Biol. 20:1165–70
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Carlson SM, Koenig MA, Harms MB 2013. Theory of mind. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev. Cogn. Sci. 4:391–402
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Carter RM, Huettel SA. 2013. A nexus model of the temporal-parietal junction. Trends Cogn. Sci. 17:328–36
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Chein J, Albert D, O'Brien L, Uckert K, Steinberg L 2011. Peers increase adolescent risk taking by enhancing activity in the brain's reward circuitry. Dev. Sci. 14:F1–10Important study showing for the first time that peers influence neural activity when taking risks more in adolescents than in adults.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Christakou A, Brammer M, Rubia K 2011. Maturation of limbic corticostriatal activation and connectivity associated with developmental changes in temporal discounting. NeuroImage 54:1344–54
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Crocetti E, Moscatelli S, Van der Graaff J, Rubini M, Meeus W, Branje SJ 2016. The interplay of self-certainty and prosocial development in the transition from late adolescence to emerging adulthood. Eur. J. Pers. 30:594–607
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Crone EA, Dahl RE. 2012. Understanding adolescence as a period of social-affective engagement and goal flexibility. Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 13:636–50
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Crone EA, Konijn EA. 2018. Media use and brain development during adolescence. Nat. Commun. 9:588
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Cutler J, Campbell-Meiklejohn D. 2019. A comparative fMRI meta-analysis of altruistic and strategic decisions to give. NeuroImage 184:227–41
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Dahl RE, Allen NB, Wilbrecht L, Suleiman AB 2018. Importance of investing in adolescence from a developmental science perspective. Nature 554:441–50
    [Google Scholar]
  32. D'Argembeau A. 2013. On the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in self-processing: the valuation hypothesis. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 7:372
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Davidow JY, Insel C, Somerville LH 2018. Adolescent development of value-guided goal pursuit. Trends Cogn. Sci. 22:8725–36
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Denny BT, Kober H, Wager TD, Ochsner KN 2012. A meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies of self- and other judgments reveals a spatial gradient for mentalizing in medial prefrontal cortex. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 24:1742–52
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Duell N, Steinberg L, Chein J, Al-Hassan SM, Bacchini D et al. 2016. Interaction of reward seeking and self-regulation in the prediction of risk taking: a cross-national test of the dual systems model. Dev. Psychol. 52:1593–605
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Dumontheil I, Apperly IA, Blakemore SJ 2010. Online usage of theory of mind continues to develop in late adolescence. Dev. Sci. 13:331–38
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Dumontheil I, Hillebrandt H, Apperly IA, Blakemore SJ 2012. Developmental differences in the control of action selection by social information. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 24:2080–95
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Dunbar RIM. 2018. The anatomy of friendship. Trends Cogn. Sci. 22:32–51
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Falk EB, Bassett DS. 2017. Brain and social networks: fundamental building blocks of human experience. Trends Cogn. Sci. 21:674–90
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Fehr E, Bernhard H, Rockenbach B 2008. Egalitarianism in young children. Nature 454:1079–83
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Fett AK, Gromann PM, Giampietro V, Shergill SS, Krabbendam L 2014a. Default distrust? An fMRI investigation of the neural development of trust and cooperation. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 9:395–402Elegant functional neuroimaging study showing how building reciprocal relations during multiple trust trials results in stronger medial prefrontal cortex activity in adolescents compared to adults.
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Fett AK, Shergill SS, Gromann PM, Dumontheil I, Blakemore SJ et al. 2014b. Trust and social reciprocity in adolescence—a matter of perspective-taking. J. Adolesc. 37:175–84
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Fuligni AJ. 2019. The need to contribute during adolescence. Pers. Psychol. Sci. 14:3331–43
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Genevsky A, Yoon C, Knutson B 2017. When brain beats behavior: neuroforecasting crowdfunding outcomes. J. Neurosci. 37:8625–34
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Güroğlu B, van den Bos W, Crone EA 2009. Fairness considerations: increasing understanding of intentionality during adolescence. J. Exp. Child Psychol. 104:398–409
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Güroğlu B, van den Bos W, Crone EA 2014a. Sharing and giving across adolescence: an experimental study examining the development of prosocial behavior. Front. Psychol. 5:291
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Güroğlu B, van den Bos W, van Dijk E, Rombouts SA, Crone EA 2011. Dissociable brain networks involved in development of fairness considerations: understanding intentionality behind unfairness. NeuroImage 57:634–41
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Güroğlu B, Will GJ, Crone EA 2014b. Neural correlates of advantageous and disadvantageous inequity in sharing decisions. PLOS ONE 9:e107996
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Haber SN, Knutson B. 2010. The reward circuit: linking primate anatomy and human imaging. Neuropsychopharmacology 35:4–26
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Han S, Ma Y. 2014. Cultural differences in human brain activity: a quantitative meta-analysis. NeuroImage 99:293–300
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Harter S. 2012. The Construction of the Self: Developmental and Sociocultural Foundations New York: The Guilford Press. , 2nd ed..
  52. Herting MM, Johnson C, Mills KL, Vijayakumar N, Dennison M et al. 2018. Development of subcortical volumes across adolescence in males and females: a multisample study of longitudinal changes. NeuroImage 172:194–205
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Hughes BL, Ambady N, Zaki J 2017. Trusting outgroup, but not ingroup members, requires control: neural and behavioral evidence. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 12:372–81
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Izuma K, Saito DN, Sadato N 2010. Processing of the incentive for social approval in the ventral striatum during charitable donation. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 22:621–31
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Jankowski KF, Moore WE, Merchant JS, Kahn LE, Pfeifer JH 2014. But do you think I'm cool? Developmental differences in striatal recruitment during direct and reflected social self-evaluations. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 8:40–54One of the first functional neuroimaging studies on self-concept development showing that self-concept in adolescence is sensitive to social context.
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Kanai R, Bahrami B, Roylance R, Rees G 2012. Online social network size is reflected in human brain structure. Proc. R. Soc. B Biol. Sci. 279:1327–34
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Knoll LJ, Magis-Weinberg L, Speekenbrink M, Blakemore SJ 2015. Social influence on risk perception during adolescence. Psychol. Sci. 26:583–92This large behavioral study indicates a sensitive window for peer sensitivity, especially in early adolescence.
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Kroger J, Martinussen M, Marcia JE 2010. Identity status change during adolescence and young adulthood: a meta-analysis. J. Adolesc. 33:683–98
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Lamblin M, Murawski C, Whittle S, Fornito A 2017. Social connectedness, mental health and the adolescent brain. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 80:57–68
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Lee TH, Qu Y, Telzer EH 2017. Love flows downstream: mothers' and children's neural representation similarity in perceiving distress of self and family. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 12:1916–27
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Lockwood PL, Apps MA, Valton V, Viding E, Roiser JP 2016. Neurocomputational mechanisms of prosocial learning and links to empathy. PNAS 113:9763–68
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Luerssen A, Gyurak A, Ayduk O, Wendelken C, Bunge SA 2015. Delay of gratification in childhood linked to cortical interactions with the nucleus accumbens. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 10:1769–76
    [Google Scholar]
  63. McClure SM, Laibson DI, Loewenstein G, Cohen JD 2004. Separate neural systems value immediate and delayed monetary rewards. Science 306:503–7
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Meeus W. 2011. The study of adolescent identity formation 2000–2010: a review of longitudinal research. J. Res. Adolesc. 21:75–94
    [Google Scholar]
  65. Meuwese R, Braams BR, Güroğlu B 2018. What lies beneath peer acceptance in adolescence? Exploring the role of Nucleus Accumbens responsivity to self-serving and vicarious rewards. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 34:124–29
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Michl P, Meindl T, Meister F, Born C, Engel RR et al. 2014. Neurobiological underpinnings of shame and guilt: a pilot fMRI study. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 9:150–57
    [Google Scholar]
  67. Mills KL, Lalonde F, Clasen LS, Giedd JN, Blakemore SJ 2014. Developmental changes in the structure of the social brain in late childhood and adolescence. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 9:123–31This longitudinal structural neuroimaging study demonstrated prolonged developmental changes in social brain structures over the entire adolescence period.
    [Google Scholar]
  68. Mischel W, Shoda Y, Rodriguez MI 1989. Delay of gratification in children. Science 244:933–38
    [Google Scholar]
  69. Moffitt TE, Arseneault L, Belsky D, Dickson N, Hancox RJ et al. 2011. A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety. PNAS 108:2693–98
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Moor BG, Macks ZA, Güroğlu B, Rombouts SA, Molen MW, Crone EA 2012. Neurodevelopmental changes of reading the mind in the eyes. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 7:44–52
    [Google Scholar]
  71. Morelli SA, Knutson B, Zaki J 2018. Neural sensitivity to personal and vicarious reward differentially relates to prosociality and well-being. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 13:831–39This functional neuroimaging study in adults demonstrated that neural activity in the ventral striatum during vicarious rewards relates to real-life prosocial behavior.
    [Google Scholar]
  72. Morelli SA, Sacchet MD, Zaki J 2015. Common and distinct neural correlates of personal and vicarious reward: a quantitative meta-analysis. NeuroImage 112:244–53
    [Google Scholar]
  73. Morey RA, McCarthy G, Selgrade ES, Seth S, Nasser JD, LaBar KS 2012. Neural systems for guilt from actions affecting self versus others. NeuroImage 60:683–92
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Odgers C. 2018. Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all. Nature 554:432–34
    [Google Scholar]
  75. O'Donnell MB, Bayer JB, Cascio CN, Falk EB 2017. Neural bases of recommendations differ according to social network structure. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 12:61–69
    [Google Scholar]
  76. Olson EA, Hooper CJ, Collins P, Luciana M 2007. Adolescents' performance on delay and probability discounting tasks: contributions of age, intelligence, executive functioning, and self-reported externalizing behavior. Pers. Individ. Differ. 43:1886–97
    [Google Scholar]
  77. Op de Macks ZA, Bunge SA, Bell ON, Wilbrecht L, Kriegsfeld LJ et al. 2016. Risky decision-making in adolescent girls: the role of pubertal hormones and reward circuitry. Psychoneuroendocrinology 74:77–91
    [Google Scholar]
  78. Penner LA, Dovidio JF, Piliavin JA, Schroeder DA 2005. Prosocial behavior: multilevel perspectives. Annu. Rev. Psychol. 56:365–92
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Peper JS, Braams BR, Blankenstein NE, Bos MGN, Crone EA 2018. Development of multifaceted risk taking and the relations to sex steroid hormones: a longitudinal study. Child. Dev. 89:51887–907
    [Google Scholar]
  80. Pfeifer JH, Lieberman MD, Dapretto M 2007. “I know you are but what am I?!”: neural bases of self- and social knowledge retrieval in children and adults. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 19:1323–37The first functional neuroimaging study demonstrating heightened medial prefrontal cortex activity when adolescents evaluate traits of themselves.
    [Google Scholar]
  81. Pfeifer JH, Masten CL, Borofsky LA, Dapretto M, Fuligni AJ, Lieberman MD 2009. Neural correlates of direct and reflected self-appraisals in adolescents and adults: when social perspective-taking informs self-perception. Child. Dev. 80:1016–38
    [Google Scholar]
  82. Pfeifer JH, Peake SJ. 2012. Self-development: integrating cognitive, socioemotional, and neuroimaging perspectives. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 2:55–69
    [Google Scholar]
  83. Pingault J, Schoeler T. 2017. Assessing the consequences of cyberbullying on mental health. Nat. Hum. Behav. 1:775–77
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Powell J, Lewis PA, Roberts N, Garcia-Finana M, Dunbar RI 2012. Orbital prefrontal cortex volume predicts social network size: an imaging study of individual differences in humans. Proc. R. Soc. B Biol. Sci. 279:2157–62
    [Google Scholar]
  85. Sawyer SM, Azzopardi PS, Wickremarathne D, Patton GC 2018. The age of adolescence. Lancet Child Adolesc. Health 2:223–28
    [Google Scholar]
  86. Schreuders E, Braams BR, Blankenstein NE, Peper JS, Güroğlu B, Crone EA 2018a. Contributions of reward sensitivity to ventral striatum activity across adolescence and early adulthood. Child. Dev. 89:3797–810
    [Google Scholar]
  87. Schreuders E, Klapwijk ET, Will GJ, Güroğlu B 2018b. Friend versus foe: neural correlates of prosocial decisions for liked and disliked peers. Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 18:127–42
    [Google Scholar]
  88. Schurz M, Radua J, Aichhorn M, Richlan F, Perner J 2014. Fractionating theory of mind: a meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 42:9–34
    [Google Scholar]
  89. Schwartz SJ, Klimstra TA, Luyckx K, Hale WW III, Meeus WH 2012. Characterizing the self-system over time in adolescence: internal structure and associations with internalizing symptoms. J. Youth Adolesc. 41:1208–25
    [Google Scholar]
  90. Scott RM, He Z, Baillargeon R, Cummins D 2012. False-belief understanding in 2.5-year-olds: evidence from two novel verbal spontaneous-response tasks. Dev. Sci. 15:181–93
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Silverman MH, Jedd K, Luciana M 2015. Neural networks involved in adolescent reward processing: an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies. NeuroImage 122:427–39
    [Google Scholar]
  92. Smith AR, Steinberg L, Strang N, Chein J 2015. Age differences in the impact of peers on adolescents' and adults' neural response to reward. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 11:75–82
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Somerville LH, Jones RM, Ruberry EJ, Dyke JP, Glover G, Casey BJ 2013. The medial prefrontal cortex and the emergence of self-conscious emotion in adolescence. Psychol. Sci. 24:1554–62The first functional neuroimaging study demonstrating that the feeling of being observed leads to heightened medial prefrontal cortex activity in adolescents and increased self-conscious emotions.
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Spaans JP, Burke SM, Altikulac S, Braams BR, Op de Macks ZA, Crone EA 2018. Win for your kin: neural responses to personal and vicarious rewards when mothers win for their adolescent children. PLOS ONE 13:e0198663
    [Google Scholar]
  95. Spaans JP, Peters S, Crone EA 2019. Neural reward-related reactions to monetary gains for self and charity. Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 19:845–58
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Steinbeis N, Bernhardt BC, Singer T 2012. Impulse control and underlying functions of the left DLPFC mediate age-related and age-independent individual differences in strategic social behavior. Neuron 73:1040–51
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Tamir DI, Hughes BL. 2018. Social rewards: from basic social building blocks to complex social behavior. Perspect. Psychol. Sci. 13:700–17
    [Google Scholar]
  98. Tamir DI, Mitchell JP. 2012. Disclosing information about the self is intrinsically rewarding. PNAS 109:8038–43
    [Google Scholar]
  99. Tamnes CK, Herting MM, Goddings AL, Meuwese R, Blakemore SJ et al. 2017. Development of the cerebral cortex across adolescence: a multisample study of inter-related longitudinal changes in cortical volume, surface area, and thickness. J. Neurosci. 37:3402–12
    [Google Scholar]
  100. Telzer EH, Fuligni AJ, Lieberman MD, Galvan A 2013. Ventral striatum activation to prosocial rewards predicts longitudinal declines in adolescent risk taking. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 3:45–52
    [Google Scholar]
  101. Telzer EH, Fuligni AJ, Lieberman MD, Galvan A 2014. Neural sensitivity to eudaimonic and hedonic rewards differentially predict adolescent depressive symptoms over time. PNAS 111:6600–5Highly innovative longitudinal study showing that the same neural sensitivity in the ventral striatum can lead to multiple pathways in development.
    [Google Scholar]
  102. Telzer EH, Masten CL, Berkman ET, Lieberman MD, Fuligni AJ 2010. Gaining while giving: an fMRI study of the rewards of family assistance among white and Latino youth. Soc. Neurosci. 5:508–18
    [Google Scholar]
  103. Telzer EH, Masten CL, Berkman ET, Lieberman MD, Fuligni AJ 2011. Neural regions associated with self control and mentalizing are recruited during prosocial behaviors towards the family. NeuroImage 58:242–49
    [Google Scholar]
  104. van de Groep S, Meuwese R, Zanolie K, Güroğlu B, Crone EA 2018. Developmental changes and individual differences in trust and reciprocity in adolescence. J. Res. Adolesc. In press https://doi.org/10.1111/jora.12459
    [Crossref] [Google Scholar]
  105. Van den Bos E, de Rooij M, Sumter SR, Westenberg M 2016. Continued development of recursive thinking in adolescence: longitudinal analyses with a revised recursive thinking test. Cogn. Dev. 37:28–41
    [Google Scholar]
  106. Van den Bos W, van Dijk E, Westenberg M, Rombouts SA, Crone EA 2011. Changing brains, changing perspectives: the neurocognitive development of reciprocity. Psychol. Sci. 22:60–70
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Van den Bos W, Westenberg M, Van Dijk E, Crone EA 2010. Development of trust and reciprocity in adolescence. Cogn. Dev. 25:90–102
    [Google Scholar]
  108. van der Aar LPE, Peters S, Crone EA 2018. The development of self-views across adolescence: investigating self-descriptions with and without social comparison using a novel experimental paradigm. Cogn. Dev. 48:256–70
    [Google Scholar]
  109. van der Aar LPE, Peters S, van der Cruijsen R, Crone EA 2019. The neural correlates of academic self-concept in adolescence and the relation to making future-oriented academic choices. Trends Neurosci. Educ. 15:10–17
    [Google Scholar]
  110. van der Cruijsen R, Peters S, van der Aar LPE, Crone EA 2018. The neural signature of self-concept development in adolescence: the role of domain and valence distinctions. Dev. Cogn. Neurosci. 30:1–12
    [Google Scholar]
  111. van der Meulen M, Veldhuis J, Braams BR, Peters S, Konijn EA, Crone EA 2017. Brain activation upon ideal-body media exposure and peer feedback in late adolescent girls. Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 17:4712–23
    [Google Scholar]
  112. van Duijvenvoorde AC, Achterberg M, Braams BR, Peters S, Crone EA 2016. Testing a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development using resting-state connectivity analyses. NeuroImage 124:409–20
    [Google Scholar]
  113. Van Hoorn J, Van Dijk E, Güroğlu B, Crone EA 2016a. Neural correlates of prosocial peer influence on public goods game donations during adolescence. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 11:923–33
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Van Hoorn J, Van Dijk E, Meuwese R, Rieffe C, Crone EA 2016b. Peer influence on prosocial behavior in adolescence. J. Res. Adolesc. 26:90–100
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Wierenga LM, Bos MGN, Schreuders E, van de Kamp F, Peper JS et al. 2018. Unraveling age, puberty and testosterone effects on subcortical brain development across adolescence. Psychoneuroendocrinology 91:105–14
    [Google Scholar]
  116. Yeager DS, Dahl RE, Dweck CS 2018. Why interventions to influence adolescent behavior often fail but could succeed. Perspect. Psychol. Sci. 13:101–22Influential review article showing the importance of evaluating adolescents’ needs for social status and admiration when developing successful interventions.
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-psych-010419-050937
Loading
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-psych-010419-050937
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error