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Abstract

Research in psychology has shown that even routinely experienced everyday objects such as brands can trigger cognitively engaging, emotional, and socially meaningful experiences. In this article, we review three key areas where current advances reside: brands as passive objects with utilitarian and symbolic meanings, brands as relationship partners and regulators of personal relationships, and brands as creators of social identity with social group linking value. Research in these areas is grounded in a number of fundamental perspectives within cognitive, emotional, motivational, personality, interpersonal, and group psychology. We conclude by addressing emerging areas for research.

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2021-01-04
2024-06-21
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