1932

Abstract

The restorative function of sleep is shaped by its duration, timing, continuity, subjective quality, and efficiency. Current sleep recommendations specify only nocturnal duration and have been largely derived from sleep self-reports that can be imprecise and miss relevant details. Sleep duration, preferred timing, and ability to withstand sleep deprivation are heritable traits whose expression may change with age and affect the optimal sleep prescription for an individual. Prevailing societal norms and circumstances related to work and relationships interact to influence sleep opportunity and quality. The value of allocating time for sleep is revealed by the impact of its restriction on behavior, functional brain imaging, sleep macrostructure, and late-life cognition. Augmentation of sleep slow oscillations and spindles have been proposed for enhancing sleep quality, but they inconsistently achieve their goal. Crafting bespoke sleep recommendations could benefit from large-scale, longitudinal collection of objective sleep data integrated with behavioral and self-reported data.

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2023-01-18
2024-07-17
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-psych-032620-034127
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