1932

Abstract

This review discusses the state of theory and research on how and under what conditions religion shapes various adolescent outcomes such as health, education, sexual behavior, and substance use. We focus on the latest theoretical advancements with respect to the avenues through which religious practice and belief might play positive or negative roles in the lives of adolescents. We also summarize an emerging literature on the conditions under which religion has stronger or weaker relationships with certain outcomes. In the end, we call on sociologists to extend the study of religion and adolescents through greater attention to the religious and sociocultural contexts in which religiousness is experienced (e.g., religious tradition or congregation, gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, and social class).

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2019-07-30
2024-07-13
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