1932

Abstract

This review considers sociological perspectives and research on the outcomes and implications of forced and refugee migration for migrants and communities of settlement. Analytic constraints and opportunities posed by concepts of forced and refugee migration and migrants for empirical research are underscored. The tendencies for research on forced and refugee migration to serve policy and programs are addressed in relationship to the conceptualization of processes of displacement as well as research design. A social demographic lens is used to illustrate a record of research on the consequences of forced and refugee migration and settlement. Accordingly, we review empirical literature on patterns of spatial mobility, health and well-being, social and economic integration, and family and community dynamics at different scales. Implications of global issues such as climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic are considered. Analytic issues emerge from the intersections, and lack thereof, between forced migration, refugee studies, and migration policy analysis and provide critical opportunities for contributions by sociologists and social scientists more generally.

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2023-07-31
2024-04-13
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